With the help of our local knowledge of Bristol you will get the most out of your time spent in one of the most historic and vibrant cities. Each walk has been carefully tested, selected and mapped out to provide you with a selection of fantastic walks at varying difficulties and durations. We have taken the time to carefully grade the difficulty of each walk, whether your looking for a challenging or casual we have you covered.

Bristol Bridge

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Bristol Bridge, originally constructed in wood, was replaced in 1247 by a four-arched bridge of stone. However, the bridge became too small for modern traffic and, in 1768, was replaced with the one you see today. The gateway to the old city, it was originally entered through St. Nicholas Gate. The church of St. Nicholas, on the left, was over the gate.

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Clifton Down

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At the southernmost point of Clifton Down is an idyllic green flanked by Litfield Place, Harley Place and Christ Church. Penrose Cottage on Harley Road was home to the poet Walter Savage Landor. Litfield Place, formally ‘Leadfield‘, is a reminder that the Downs were once quarried. Christ Church was built in 1844 and contains relics from St. Andrew’s which was destroyed during the Second World War.

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Clifton Suspension Bridge

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Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s Clifton Suspension Bridge is a magnificent feat of engineering. Brunel won a competition by designing a bridge to span the River Avon, beating other master engineers such as Thomas Telford.

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College Green

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College Green, site of the crescent shaped Council House built in 1956, is approximately 3 acres and a popular local spot. The large hotel, built in 1868, incorporates two eighteenth-century houses in its design. In front there’s a statue of Queen Victoria, which was erected in 1887 to celebrate her Golden Jubilee.

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The Haymarket

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The Haymarket was originally held circa 1900 in St. James’s Churchyard. A road now covers the site, but the name remains the same. Start your walk at St James Church. The original Priory was erected in 1130 by the Earl of Gloucester, but it shared the fate of all monasteries at the dissolution in 1543.

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King Street

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In King Street we catch a glimpse of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The street was built outside the old walled city by merchants who wanted to create a new residential area for themselves. The cobblestone street has been preserved and the whole area is awash with architectural treasures spanning the centuries.

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Queens Road

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To the left is the “Studio“ where the Bristol inventor of cinematography, Friese-Greene, opened his first business in 1880. To the front is a statue of Edward VII, erected in 1912. In the central reservation there’s a memorial to the men of the Gloucester Regiment who lost their lives during the Boer War. On the right is Park Place, a green square overlooked by tastefully restored town houses.

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St. Augustine’s Parade

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In 1875, Bristol’s first tramlines were laid in the city centre. Before that and until 1892, ships sailed into the city on the River Frome. Up to 1827, a drawbridge was in service allowing access to the other side of the river.

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Victoria Street

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In 1240 the River Frome was diverted through Canon’s Marsh to join the Avon close to the present Bathurst Basin in order to provide a harbour close to the town centre.

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